27.09.13 - 17.11.13

Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu

Opening: Friday 27 September 2013 - 20:00

Exhibition
Courtesy Royal Museum for Central Africa, Tervuren.
Courtesy Royal Museum for Central Africa, Tervuren.
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin. Gouache by Ntendu, collection André Magnin, Paris.
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin. Gouache by Ntendu, collection André Magnin, Paris.
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin. Gouache by Ntendu, collection Pierre Loos, Brussels.
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin. Gouache by Ntendu, collection Pierre Loos, Brussels.
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin
Vincent Meessen & Tshyela Ntendu, 'Patterns for (Re)cognition', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin

Patterns for (Re)cognition

KIOSK presents the duo show Patterns for (re)cognition, with works by Belgian artist Vincent Meessen (1971, Baltimore, US) and Congolese artist Tshyela Ntendu (ca. 1890 – ca. 1950, Congo). The exhibition makes unexpected connections between the various uses of abstraction in psychology, art and design.

During his current research on colonial psychology, Vincent Meessen was intrigued by the relation between the formal abstraction of certain cognitive tests and Western geometrical abstract art. By displaying a curated section of abstract paintings from the late 1920s by one of the two so-called first modern Congolese artists, the pioneer Tshyela Ntendu (aka Djilatendo), Meessen proposes a ‘constructivist scenario’ that problematizes the Western narrative of abstraction in regard to so-called primitive ornament.

The title, Patterns for (re)cognition, refers to the jargon of cognitive psychology and in particular to the tests designed to measure the capacity of our brain for abstraction and memory; mental operations that are based on recognition and identification of recurrent impulses (signs, sounds, forms, patterns, letters, faces …).

26.04.13 - 16.06.13

Kelly Schacht

Opening: Friday 27 September 2013 - 20:00

Exhibition
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Tom Callemin.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Laurent Fobe.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Laurent Fobe.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013.  Photo Laurent Fobe.
Kelly Schacht, 'It seems economical to make use of a character already in play', 2013. Photo Laurent Fobe.

It seems economical to make use of a character already in play

KIOSK presents an exhibition that combines work by Belgian artist Kelly Schacht and Swedish artist Annika Eriksson.
Kelly Schacht responds to the exhibition space and Annika Eriksson’s work. For the duration of her show It seems economical to make use of a character already in play the empty rooms will be activated by temporary interventions or ‘characters’ whose performative presence will resound in the human absence emphasized by Eriksson. This approach is based in the uncertain and in coincidence: an openness that is prerequisite for Schacht’s ongoing research into the perception and practice of exhibiting and the dynamic space in which it takes place. By way of theatrical constructions, Schacht stages a fragmented dialogue between space and matter, illusion and reality.

In ‘It seems economical to make use of a character already in play’ this approach results in a scenario, tailored to the exhibition space, that will unfold over the course of the seven weeks of the exhibition. Like a postscript, this minimal scenography will address what is hidden and appeal to the visitors’ imagination.

Both artists – each grounded in their respective generations – work with the same kind of ideas in presentations that rely on the staged and the imaginary, and on the factors of time, language, the viewer and social interaction. With their cinematographic constructions and minimal interventions they introduce the audience into a fragmented narrative dimension. Where Eriksson mainly directs the exhibition space through the use of film, Schacht manipulates it with the aid of objects and people. Both narrative styles make use of the reversal of time and language, giving their scenarios an aura both of recognition and of the indefinable, like blind spots or ambiguous vacuums in space and time.

Kelly Schacht received the 2011 Young Belgian Painters Award and has showed her work at the Gwangju Biennial (2012); De Vleeshal, Middelburg (2011); Hoet Bekaert Gallery, Ghent; Cultuurcentrum Strombeek, Grimbergen; Coupe de ville, Sint-Niklaas (2010); Netwerk – Centre for Contemporary Art (2008); and in Coming People in S.M.A.K, Ghent (2006), among others. She is represented by Meessen De Clercq, Brussels.

26.04.13 - 16.06.13

Annika Eriksson

Opening: Friday 26 April 2013 - 20:00

Exhibition
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Annika Eriksson, 'I am the dog that was always here (loop)', 2014. Photo Laurent Fobe.

I am the dog that was always here (loop)

KIOSK presents an exhibition that combines work by Swedish artist Annika Eriksson and Belgian artist Kelly Schacht.
With ‘I am the dog that was always here (loop)’, KIOSK presents the first exhibition in Belgium by Annika Eriksson. Eriksson bases her work in scenarios where the perception of time, structures of power, and once acclaimed social visions are called into question. Strategically, she plays with debates around the public realm and structures that regulate it, revealing urban changes and how this is subject to unexpected political appropriations and inversions.

Eriksson’s works in the exhibition engages with questions of time, its documented forms, and its reversal. Throughout the rooms, Eriksson sets up a number of possible scenarios in video works and three-dimensional interventions that include photographs, light boxes and panes of glass – extended elements of the film in space. The central piece of the presentation is the new video installation in the hemicycle room called I am the dog that was always here (loop) (2013). The video, set in the outskirts of Istanbul, focuses on moments of transition and marginalised experiences of time, seen through the lens of a street dog. Having been moved by the authorities to peripheral pockets and no man’s lands outside the expanding city, the dogs are continuously moving along lines of gentrification and corporate city making. Through looping and repetition, Eriksson relates this process to an experience of time: exploring the present as a complex gap between past and future, one in which an increasing process of erasure, spurred on by a shrinking public realm, also removes other registers of being and seeing.

Annika Eriksson’s I am the dog that was always here (loop) was realized with the support of the Goethe-Institut, Istanbul.

Annika Eriksson has previously presented solo shows in, or was commissioned by: When Attitudes Became Form Become Attitudes, Wattis Institute, San Francisco (2012); Kunstlerhaus Stuttgart (2012); Europe N, GFZK, Leipzig (2011); DAAD Galerie, Berlin (2010); Hayward Gallery, London (2010) and Sheffield Biennale (2008). Eriksson took part in numerous international group shows including Shanghai Biennale and Kiev Biennale (2012), Venice Biennale (2005) and Sao Paulo Biennale (2002). Eriksson is represented by KROME Gallery, Berlin and NON Gallery, Istanbul.

15.02.13 - 14.04.13

Ulla von Brandenburg

Opening: Friday 15 February 2013 - 20:00

Exhibition
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Shadowplay', 2012.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Shadowplay', 2012.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque. Filmstill 'Spiegellied I & II (Mirrorsong I & II)', 2012. Courtesy of the artist.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque. Filmstill 'Spiegellied I & II (Mirrorsong I & II)', 2012. Courtesy of the artist.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Ulla von Brandenburg, 'Gleich Gleich Gleich', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.

Gleich Gleich Gleich

With Gleich Gleich Gleich, KIOSK presents the first Belgian solo show by artist Ulla von Brandenburg (Karlsruhe, 1974, currently based in Paris). Von Brandenburg’s artistic practice is a visualization of the tensions between reality and fiction, visitor and actor, subject and object. Hallucination, mirror images and illusion influence the way we look and von Brandenburg’s theatrical style continually responds to this.

The artist starts from complex story lines, which she interweaves with ritual acts, historical references and elements from contemporary popular culture. Inspirations drawn from baroque theatre, German romanticism, trompe-l’oeil, literature and the occult come together in spatial installations consisting of coloured textile, theatre backdrops, watercolours, murals and film pieces. These elements are all specifically created and staged for the exhibition space concerned, resulting in unique scenographies and immersive experiences.

KIOSK presents Ulla von Brandenburg with the opportunity to bring together all aspects of her diverse oeuvre in a single comprehensive presentation. The exhibition combines two recent video works with an installation specifically conceived for the space.

KIOSK’s central dome room takes on the guise of a circular amphitheatre: wooden stands encircle the space and become the setting for the film Shadowplay (2012). This work, inspired by the classical nineteenth-century French shadow play, highlights the existential role of the actor and revolves around the dualist point where the actor as a subject is taken over by the fiction of the part. Fascinations like the deconstruction of theatrical conventions, the strategy of the artificial and the confrontation with the real or represented image are further explored in the second video, Spiegellied (‘Mirror Song’, 2012). For the cabinet rooms von Brandenburg has conceived new textile work that creates the visual illusion of sun-bleached curtains.

Ulla von Brandenburg’s work is featured regularly in international group shows and at important biennials, such as the Biennial of Lyon (2011) and the Venice Biennial (2009). Solo shows of von Brandenburg’s work have been presented at Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2012), Le Plateau-FRAC, Île de France, Paris (2011), Chisenhale, London (2009), CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, San Francisco (2008), Kunstverein Düsseldorf (2008), Docking Station, Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam (2008) & Kunsthalle Zürich (2006).

Nr. 6

Author:

The publication appears on the occasion of Ulla von Brandenburg's exhibition ‘Gleich Gleich Gleich’ at KIOSK (16.02.2013 – 14.04.2013).

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07.12.12 - 13.01.13

Jean Bernard Koeman

Opening: Friday 7 December 2012 - 20:00

Exhibition
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo We Document Art.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Jean Bernard Koeman, 'Observatory Crest', 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.

Observatory Crest

A ‘scenography-as-installation’ by visual artist Jean Bernard Koeman (°1964) and the KIOSK exhibition space are set to engage in a fascinating interaction. The installation is a result of Koeman’s collaboration as a scenographer with dancer/choreographer Koen Augustijnen (Les Ballets C de la B) and actress/director Abke Haring (Toneelhuis). Thematically, it is based on the notion of ‘complicit architecture’ and it contains associative references to Ho Chi Minh’s stilt house, Apollo 13’s ill-fated journey and the form language of Buckminster Fuller.

Observatory Crest, the show’s title, refers to the concept of the exhibition as vantage point: a custom-built hiding place from where the world can be observed and studied. In his research and collaborations, Koeman always works towards proposals for a performative ‘state’ or a temporary ‘situation’. The eventual performance is then directed by the space as a source of energy and as a measure, and apart from some details made in advance, the works are constructed on site.

The scenography at KIOSK combines a number of Koeman’s existing installations with new in situ work. Sculptures in wood and metal mix with photographs, texts and drawings. On this ornamental level a whole series of storylines meet, making for discordant and complex intertextuality. An intuitive and associative path unwinds through the exhibition space on a non-linear time track. Koeman thus effectively transforms KIOSK into an experiential environment where time and space are experienced subjectively. In a subjective mental experience of architecture, the visitor is confronted with a human or rational structure that is capable of expressing and relating emotions and thoughts about façade, conflictive artistic relations, modernism, and the history of art and architecture.

Koeman sublimates socio-political phenomena from reality into abstract, immersive installations. In the margins of influential historical events we also find a series of personal, anecdotal stories in the exhibition. The staged scenes function as sculptural platforms that are occupied at specific moments by human actors, or that materialize from a constellation of tangible materials, architectural forms, and ideas from our cultural history. They are models for reflection that formulate questions about how sculpture can manifest itself, but they are also illustrations of the ways in which society and our gaze function. As such, Koeman explores the boundary between quotation and autonomous poetics in sculpture, and the point where a sculpture attains a state of scalelessness.

Jean Bernard Koeman is a visual artist and curator. Between 1998 and 2003 he was director of the Arts Centre W139 in Amsterdam, where he staged more than 40 exhibitions with young artists. As a visiting professor, he is affiliated with the Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam and MAPS in Sierre, Switzerland. As a scenographer he works for Les Ballets C de la B in Ghent and Toneelhuis in Antwerp.

Observatory Crest is realized with the support of Toneelhuis and the Mondriaan Fund.

06.10.12 - 18.11.12

Claudia Wieser

Opening: Friday 5 October 2012 - 20:00

Exhibition
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Laurent Fobe.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Claudia Wieser, 'Furniture'. 2012. Photo Yana Foque.

Furniture

KIOSK opens this season with Furniture, a solo show by Berlin-based artist Claudia Wieser (°1973, Freilassing, Germany). In this exhibition, Wieser presents an ensemble of drawings, ceramic and wooden sculptures, and a spatial intervention where the walls of the cabinet rooms are covered with black-and-white prints of interiors, creating an illusionistic perspective.

Wieser’s visual style is marked by an abstraction that is precise and consistent in its form, colour and materials. Like abstract paintings, Wieser’s glazed ceramic tiles consist of geometric patterns. In one case, these are combined to form a large sculpture that is placed in the hemicycle room like a free-standing folding screen. Surrounding the screen are wooden sculptures that are made up of elementary shapes like cylinders, cones and spheres. There is a thematic and pictorial resonance between the spatial intervention and the series of framed drawings and photographs overlaid with geometric compositions in gold leaf and pencil.

These pure studies in form and colour are indebted to the early twentieth-century Bauhaus legacy. Parallel to the teaching methods of this school, Wieser employs craftsmanship and a subjective palette in her attempt to attain an autonomous pictorial aesthetics in which functionality, art and spirituality are tightly interwoven. Her artistic research is based on complex references and universal, stylistic elements from art history. It appropriates the formal rules of early modernist artworks and questions their objectivity, realism and functionality.

This method and the title of the exhibition also point us to the central concern of Wieser’s current work: what is the status of sculptures that have been designed as objects? Wieser’s oeuvre is developed in response to this question and it explores the boundaries between pure and applied forms of art. The artist intensifies the primary relations between form, matter and concept in order to bring out the pure appearance of the image itself. Only then the internal nature of the object can be externalized.

Claudia Wieser has exhibited solo at Sies+Höke Gallery, Düsseldorf (2012), Galleria S.A.L.E.S, Rome (2012), Galerie Ben Kaufmann, Berlin (2011), The Drawing Center, New York (2010), Schauort, Zurich (2010), Galerie Eva Winkeler, Frankfurt (2009), and Kunstverein Oldenburg with Bernd Ribbeck (2009). Recent collective exhibitions in which she participated have been held at Marta Herford / Museum Schloss Moyland (2012), Gerog Kolbe Museum Berlin (2011), Kunstmuseum Stuttgart / Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg (2011), Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York (2011) and K21 Kunstsammlungen Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf (2010).

Furniture

Author: Liene Aerts, Alexander Garcia Düttmann, Zoë Gray, Wim Waelput

The publication appears on the occasion of Claudia Wieser’s exhibition 'Furniture' at KIOSK (06.10.2012 – 18.11.2012).

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13.04.12 - 10.06.12

Jan Kempenaers

Opening: Friday 13 April 2012 - 20:00

Exhibition
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Jan Kempenaers, 'In Search of the Picturesque', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.

In Search of the Picturesque

The upcoming exhibition at KIOSK lets the photographic output of Belgian artist Jan Kempenaers engage with the monumental work of German artist Karsten Födinger. These contrasting practices both start from a landscape context – rural or urban – to subsequently translate them to autonomous aesthetics of the image within a spatial or photographic exhibition frame. As such, it affects our assumptions of recognizable landscape typologies.

As part of his PhD in the visual arts, Jan Kempenaers’ show In Search of the Picturesque presents an overview of the artist’s photographic work of the past years. The body of work represents a visual study of the eighteenth-century notion of the picturesque in the present-day landscape image and its contemporary relevance. The particular picturesque mood evoked by Kempenaers in his photographic oeuvre, strongly manifests itself in his recent ruins pictures and natural landscapes such as inhospitable rock formations and thick forests; images that specifically engage with our conceptualization of the nineteenth-century romantic landscape. Although much less explicitly, the characteristics of the picturesque are also apparent in Kempenaers’ earlier works: these photographic series show massive Yugoslav monuments in deserted natural landscapes, or panoramic urban and industrial landscapes. Whether the pictures frame ‘unspoilt’ wildernesses, a politically charged monument as a modern variant of the ‘romantic’ ruins, or an urban typology, they invariably employ a recognizable, picturesque visual style to represent a specific undeniable contemporary reality.

Jan Kempenaers (1968, Heist-op-den-Berg, Belgium) has recently exhibited solo at Be-Part Waregem (2010), de Garage Mechelen (2010) and Middelheimmuseum Antwerp (2007). His work has been part of numerous group shows, including some at M HKA Antwerp (2012), BOZAR Brussels (2011), S.M.A.K. Ghent (2009) and MARTa Herford (2009).

13.04.12 - 10.06.12

Karsten Födinger

Opening: Friday 13 April 2012 - 20:00

Exhibition
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Karsten Födinger, 'Void', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.

Void

The upcoming exhibition at KIOSK lets the monumental work of German artist Karsten Födinger engage with the photographic output of Belgian artist Jan Kempenaers. These contrasting practices both start from a landscape context – rural or urban – to subsequently translate them to autonomous aesthetics of the image within a spatial or photographic exhibition frame. As such, it affects our assumptions of recognizable landscape typologies.

Karsten Födinger’s massive sculptures and architectural installations take shape in proportion to the exhibition space. His site-specific interventions exude a captivating physical presence. Both in their construction and engineering and in the use of unpolished and functional materials, the sculptures refer to the building sector and its basic industrial typologies.
For his show Void, Födinger realizes a new piece for KIOSK’s central dome room. Födinger constructs a sculpture in ‘rebars’, suggesting the shape of the steel reinforcements of a bridge pier. Födinger filters this element from reality and translates it to a personal, utopian creation process, which precisely sets out from an imaginary functionality, offering up space for a subjective experience. As hinted at by the show’s title, the sculpture not only functions through its self-evident materiality, but just as much through the emptiness that comes with it. The work’s meaning is generated not so much in its formal appearance as in the process of its physical realization.

The exhibition is realised with the generous support of Nv Staalbeton.

Karsten Födinger (1978, Mönchengladbach, Germany) has presented solo exhibitions at Kunst Halle St. Gallen (2012) and Palais de Tokyo Paris (2011). His work has been on display in group shows on numerous occasions, including at Temporäre Kunsthalle Berlijn (2010) and Kunsthaus Baselland Muttenz (2010). Karsten Födinger is represented by RaebervonStenglin in Zürich.

10.02.12 - 25.03.12

Nick Oberthaler

Opening: Friday 10 February 2012 - 20:00

Exhibition
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Nick Oberthaler, 'Eventuality of an Attempt', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.

Eventuality of an Attempt

The upcoming exhibition at KIOSK is a double-bill of solo presentations by Austrian artist Nick Oberthaler (°1981, Bad Ischl, based in Brussels) and Dutch artist Sara van der Heide (°1977, Busan, based in Amsterdam).
In their presentations, both artists investigate the possibilities fundamentally inherent in the pictorial medium. Oberthaler mainly focuses on the formal pictorial traditions, prying them open to widen their scope, where Van der Heide examines art-historical dogmas and historical political certainties from a contemporary perspective. The works on display in both cases testify of a specific sensitivity for the incorporeal aspects of painting, watercolours or drawing.

Nick Oberthaler brings his show Eventuality of an Attempt to KIOSK. The attempt in question is one he will undertake to attain a condensed atmospheric experience through the use of mixed techniques on paper, sculpture and the integration of a spatial intervention. But the title also stresses the precariousness of this attempt and the idea that the exhibition’s form will never be fully realized or ‘complete’.
Oberthaler is fully aware of the traditional formal components of which the pictorial representation of a landscape is composed. Horizontal lines slide through several of his abstract geometric designs like so many limitless horizons in landscapes.
The same intention will also gear the treatment of KIOSK’s architectural landscape: the central dome room accommodates four equal spaces created by a cruciform construction of gypsum board. Some of the wall boards function as temporary drawing and painting surfaces, others bear Oberthaler’s pictorial ‘canvases on paper’ and ‘paint drawings’ that are mainly made with Indian ink, wax, pastels, gouache, photographic fragments and collages. These expand onto the mirror-covered wall construction to become three-dimensional temporary landscapes. The work thus explores the material and spatial boundaries of painting. With German romanticism as an undercurrent throughout Eventuality of an Attempt, the artist expresses the yearning to reach a similar level of the sublime through reduction.

10.02.12 - 25.03.12

Sara van der Heide

Opening: Friday 10 February 2012 - 00:00

Exhibition
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.
Sara van der Heide, 'Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20', 2012. Photo Yana Foque.

Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20

The upcoming exhibition at KIOSK is a double-bill of solo presentations by Dutch artist Sara van der Heide (°1977, Busan, based in Amsterdam) and Austrian artist Nick Oberthaler (°1981, Bad Ischl, based in Brussels) .
In their presentations, both artists investigate the possibilities fundamentally inherent in the pictorial medium. Oberthaler mainly focuses on the formal pictorial traditions, prying them open to widen their scope, where Van der Heide examines art-historical dogmas and historical political certainties from a contemporary perspective. The works on display in both cases testify of a specific sensitivity for the incorporeal aspects of painting, watercolours or drawing.

Sara van der Heide presents a series of twenty watercolours under the title of Claim to Universality. Colour Theory Exercise 1-20 (2011). The series is based on a drawing from 1927 by Lena Bergner, a student of Paul Klee’s at the Bauhaus in Weimar. The pictorial theories of this institute for the arts and of Paul Klee are analyzed in Van der Heide’s watercolours in their wider, ideological and theoretical framework. The serial method and modernist ideals from the twenties and thirties constitute the basis for new, hybrid combinations.
Lena Bergner’s original drawing is called Belichtung/Beschattung and shows a small circle in the upper left from which several rays of light and colour start, to fan out in a larger circle. In her twenty variations on Bergner’s drawing, Van der Heide sets out to examine the fundamental characteristics of watercolour painting such as colour and light. Her works are presented in a horizontal band in the cabinet adjacent to KIOSK’s dome room, like a waving light beam of colour and shape. The space between the colour exercises is charged with ‘cosmic energy’, a concept Paul Klee used to point out that art and nature spring from the same source and are both part of a greater, cosmic whole.